Out Loud

  • That Was Then, This Is Now

    11 October 2013

    By Norma Kipnis Wilson, October 2013

    As a little girl I believed that I could do anything that the boys could do, and I did. Particularly in sports. As I grew up I realized the limitations for girls were not self inflicted, but were very real in everyday life in society. Change was necessary. What could I do?

    A wife and mother of five, it became important that my participation in what was called "women's lib" was something I would do from home. My children marched with me on important women's issues and we have come a long way.

    As an adult I have been very active in Jewish life and particularly in Greater Miami Jewish Federation and support of Israel. I have been distressed over Israel's treatment of women. It is high time that the women of Israel take their place among the men and not allow the ultra-Orthodox community to hold them hostage.

    Perhaps we need to do a better job of informing American women of the status of women in Israel. I never knew that they had to sit in the back of the bus until recently. As the cofounder of the Lion of Judah Society which has 17,500 members from all over the world, I would like to suggest that in some way women's rights becomes a project for ALL women through all women's philanthropies.

    Norma Kipnis Wilson, co founder of the Lion of Judah Society, Board member Greater Miami Jewish Federation (life member), Board member Americans for Immigrant Justice, Board member(retired) University of Miami, Board Member (retired) Jackson Hospital Foundation.

     

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  • Cheering Vashti

    11 October 2013

    By Alexandra Stein, October 2013

    I grew up in a Reform congregation in Washington, DC that fully embraced the feminist movement. Our Cantor and one of our Rabbis were women, and on Purim, we not only booed Haman, we also cheered Vashti - because she knew that her body was her own and she did not let a man (even her husband) force her to do something with it that she did not want to do.

    As a girl, it was empowering for me to see women on the Bima reading Torah and leading prayers and sharing learning. I knew that I could grow up to be a Rabbi if I wanted, and I also knew that when I was thirteen, I would read Torah and Haftarah and be received by my congregation as a full adult member, able to help make a minyan. Receiving my tallit just before my Bat Mitzvah was very exciting. Putting it on then, and most subsequent Shabbatot, focused my mind on prayer and on G-d.

    Gender equality is not just about individual empowerment (important though that is). When I think of the impact that gender equality in American Progressive Judaism has had on my community, I mostly think of people - my childhood Rabbi and Cantor, another female Cantorial Soloist, and many lay leaders in the congregation - who quite simply would not have been there in another generation. These women had a profound impact on my life, shaping how I think and how I pray and how I live, and I know that many others in my congregation, men and women, feel the same way. Our Jewish experiences would have been deeply impoverished had they not been ordained, or allowed on the Bima.

     

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  • How Jewish Gender Equality Changed My Life

    11 October 2013

    By Sara B. Leviten, October 2013

    When Beth David Congregation, a Conservative shul in Miami, FL, voted to have equal rights for men and women, my connection to my Jewish heritage was strengthened. I was one of 18 women in an Adult Bat Mitzvah class in 1977. The six months of study for the ceremony and the ceremony itself were absolutely amazing! It was so exciting to be part of a group of women who read the Torah portion and our Haftorah. When I read The Prayer for Our Country, I changed the words so that it wasn't sexist!

    Since then, I have been called to the Torah for aliyah many times. Twenty years later, I celebrated my 50th birthday at Temple Israel of Greater Miami by reading the Maftir and the Haftorah. That was exciting, also!

    Sara B. Leviten is a lifelong resident of Miami-Dade County. Following a 31 ½ year career at Miami-Dade County Dept. of Planning and Zoning, Leviten retired in 2010. She is an activist at Temple Israel, the feminist movement, the Democratic Party, former literacy tutor at the public library, and former volunteer usher at Gusman Center. Leviten wrote a published an article about early Miami Jewish History.

     

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  • A Member of the Israeli Women’s Movement

    11 October 2013

    By Annice M. Benamy, October 2013

    My connection to my Jewish heritage was strengthened when my husband David (z'l') and I visited Israel in 2008 and 2013. Because of gender equality in American Judaism, David and I shared a love for Judaism that eventually became spiritual. Our involvement in synagogue life grew because we were able to participate together in many activities. I want to see Jewish and Israeli women continue to rise as leaders of equal rights. On our last visit to Israel, we spent 2 weeks touring schools and organizations we are involved with in the US. One of the organizations we visited was Women of the Wall. We spoke with Lesley Sacks and Shira Pruce to see how we could bring their message back to our community. I was able to witness firsthand the energy at the Kotel on Shushan Purim when Megillat Esther was read. My husband watched from the plaza taking pictures and videos of my participation. I am now a member of the Women of the Wall Speakers Bureau so I can encourage groups to help Israel's women's rights movement. Just as the feminist movement in the US was successful, so too will the women's rights movement be in Israel.

    Annice Benamy lives in Teaneck, NJ. She is a member of Temple Sinai of Bergen County in Tenafly, NJ.

     

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  • An Eye Opening Shabbat

    11 October 2013

    By Amiee C. Kushner, October 2013

    As a young woman who grew up in the ’80s with a feminist mother in the Bay Area, discrimination was always something that was to be strived against, but rarely did I actually experience it. As an adult there was always an orange on my Seder plate, women on the bimas in my spiritual homes and a mechitza was something from old dusty books about sheltl life.

    This past July I embarked on my long delayed first trip to Israel. Through my involvement in NIF I knew of the institutionalized gender discrimination that occurred in Israel, but I was thoroughly unprepared for the pain of experiencing it first-hand.

    People talk of their “ah-ha” Israel moments and mine began the minute I stepped up to the entrance of the Kotel for Kabbalat Shabbat and saw the signs indicating separate entrances for women and men. The bold, black lettering over the gates began a profound, almost physical, shock at the realization that a significant portion of the Jewish men I was surrounded by saw me as lesser and unworthy of same level of spirituality connectedness to my faith as they.

    Oddly our group was granted entrance through a third gate, not segregated by gender, or I doubt I would have been able to enter. I made it a few feet past the mechitza into the tiny women's’ section shrouded under a scaffold, before turning back and awaiting the rest of my group to finish their prayers, desperately wanting to flee. I was told by our tour Rabbi prior to walking to the Kotel that I would experience a deep spiritual connection to Judaism and my ancestors, but all I could feel was spiritual deflation.

    Upon returning home my first act was a donation to Women of the Wall. I then reveled in rediscovering the joy of my home community where girls are called to the Torah alongside the boys, where women are rabbis and leaders, and the Sabbath bride is greeted is among equals.

    Amiee C. Kushner is an active leader in San Francisco's Young Adult Jewish community, including as a New Gen Leadership Council Member for the New Israel Fund.

     

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Israel's dilemma: Who can be an Israeli?

By Daniel Sokatch and David N. Myers

13 January 2014